Febuary 2021: Wrap Up

Looking back February was a pretty good month and I watched some really great shows and movies even if I didn’t get to finish a book in February.

Movies watched

Penguin bloom

Cute movie that made my heart feel warm.

Host

A really great horror film solidly set in the time and feel of 2020.

Hush

Intense horror with a deaf main character that would have been made better by proper representation.

Tv shows watched

Season 2, 3, and 4 of futurama

The bulk of what I’ve been watching lately and it’s only gotten better and better!

Season 2 The Mandalorian

Best part of this show was the finale and of course the relationship between Mando and baby Yoda. I loved it!

Games played

Genshin impact 1.3 update

I did a whole post on this but 1.3 was great! I loved the events and I even landed a Xiao in the coolest way which I talked all about in my blog post about Genshin Impact.

Overloot

This game is so cute! I drop in and play every once in a while and it’s a fun connect the weapons kind of game.

The Arcana

This is a visual novel type game and I love the romance in it and the mini game that you do daily. I know I’ll be playing and reading along for a long time.

Game playthroughs watched

Captain sparkles vault hunters 

Little bit of Minecraft diaries 

Among us videos 

Little bit of clue videos 

Exercise done

Breath 30 days of Yoga- started and didn’t finish due to my wrist dying on me due to work. Have an appointment to get it checked out soon and it should be resolved soon enough.

THANK YOU ALL FOR READING! Let me know your thoughts down in the comments below! 

Places to donate to Trans communities:

Trans Equality 

The Trevor Project

Transgender Law Center 

Some BLM resources: 

Link to bail funds to donate to!

Link to petitions to sign! 

Link to a video to watch if you can’t donate!

My friend started Live Streaming so check them out HERE!! 

Check out my Instagram and Twitter

Check out The Book Raven Poetry website

Checkout The Book Raven Poetry Instagramand Twitter

Check out the Sisters of Twilight website.

August 2017: Wrap-Up

August was not the most productive of reading months. I only got to reading 4 different books in August. However I really enjoyed all of them and I think that is what is most important.

A Very New Day by Steven Salmon

A Very New Day is about a boy with Cerebral palsy, who goes to go regular school for the first time in junior high and uses Morse code to write. Rich Trout is unable to use his hands. Instead, he drives his electric wheelchair and writes in Morse code with his head. Rich doubts that he belongs in regular school after being isolated to special education classes only.

He is inspired by Mrs. Tilley, his English teacher, who treats him as a regular student and shows Rich that anything is possible. Rich has one dream, to be a writer. Mrs. Tilley introduces Rich to an author friend of hers, who also has Cerebral palsy, serving as an inspiration and role model.

Read my review here

Illuminae by Amie Kaufman and Jay Kristoff

This morning, Kady thought breaking up with Ezra was the hardest thing she’d have to do. This afternoon, her planet was invaded.

      The year is 2575, and two rival megacorporations are at war over a planet that’s little more than a speck at the edge of the universe. Now with enemy fire raining down on them, Kady and Ezra—who are barely even talking to each other—are forced to evacuate with a hostile warship in hot pursuit.

     But their problems are just getting started. A plague has broken out and is mutating with terrifying results; the fleet’s AI may actually be their enemy; and nobody in charge will say what’s really going on. As Kady hacks into a web of data to find the truth, it’s clear the only person who can help her is the ex-boyfriend she swore she’d never speak to again.

      Told through a fascinating dossier of hacked documents—including emails, maps, files, IMs, medical reports, interviews, and more—Illuminae is the first book in a heart-stopping trilogy about lives interrupted, the price of truth, and the courage of everyday heroes.

Read my review here

The August Beyond The Surface book club pick of the the month:

My Heart and Other Black Holes by Jasmine Warga

A stunning novel about the transformative power of love, perfect for fans of Jay Asher and Laurie Halse Anderson.

Sixteen-year-old physics nerd Aysel is obsessed with plotting her own death. With a mother who can barely look at her without wincing, classmates who whisper behind her back, and a father whose violent crime rocked her small town, Aysel is ready to turn her potential energy into nothingness.

There’s only one problem: she’s not sure she has the courage to do it alone. But once she discovers a website with a section called Suicide Partners, Aysel’s convinced she’s found her solution—Roman, a teenage boy who’s haunted by a family tragedy, is looking for a partner.

Even though Aysel and Roman have nothing in common, they slowly start to fill in each other’s broken lives. But as their suicide pact becomes more concrete, Aysel begins to question whether she really wants to go through with it. Ultimately, she must choose between wanting to die or trying to convince Roman to live so they can discover the potential of their energy together.

Read my discussion here

Ramona Blue by Julie Murphy

From Julie Murphy, the #1 New York Times bestselling author of Dumplin’ and Side Effects May Vary, comes another fearless heroine, Ramona Blue, in a gorgeously evocative novel about family, friendship, and how sometimes love can be more fluid than you first think. Perfect for fans of Rainbow Rowell and Morgan Matson.

Ramona was only five years old when Hurricane Katrina changed her life forever.

Since then, it’s been Ramona and her family against the world. Standing over six feet tall with unmistakable blue hair, Ramona is sure of three things: she likes girls, she’s fiercely devoted to her family, and she knows she’s destined for something bigger than the trailer she calls home in Eulogy, Mississippi. But juggling multiple jobs, her flaky mom, and her well-meaning but ineffectual dad forces her to be the adult of the family. Now, with her sister, Hattie, pregnant, responsibility weighs more heavily than ever.

The return of her childhood friend Freddie brings a welcome distraction. Ramona’s friendship with the former competitive swimmer picks up exactly where it left off, and soon he’s talked her into joining him for laps at the pool. But as Ramona falls in love with swimming, her feelings for Freddie begin to shift too, which is the last thing she expected. With her growing affection for Freddie making her question her sexual identity, Ramona begins to wonder if perhaps she likes girls and guys or if this new attraction is just a fluke. Either way, Ramona will discover that, for her, life and love are more fluid than they seem.

I had the pleasure of buddy reading this book with a good blogging friend Amy @Burtingwithbooks. We always have the most amazing discussions together and this read a long was absolutely amazing!

Well, that’s all for August. I think it is a good sign for September that I have already finished more books then I did in all of August. Let’s just say I’m excited for the rest of the month!

July Reading Wrap-Up


I have read 8 amazing books this month and I’m sorry to say that at the moment I am in a bit of a reading slump. Hopefully, I get over it very soon! 

Here are the books I have read this month!

And I Darken by Kiersten White 

“Absolutely riveting.” —Alexandra Bracken, #1 New York Times bestselling author of Passenger 

This vividly rendered novel reads like HBO’s Game of Thrones . . . if it were set in the Ottoman Empire. Ambitious in scope and intimate in execution, the story’s atmospheric setting is rife with political intrigue, with a deftly plotted narrative driven by fiercely passionate characters and a fearsome heroine. Fans of Victoria Aveyard’s THE RED QUEEN, Kristin Cashore’s GRACELING, and Sabaa Tahir’s AN EMBER IN THE ASHES won’t want to miss this visceral, immersive, and mesmerizing novel, the first in the And I Darken series.

NO ONE EXPECTS A PRINCESS TO BE BRUTAL. And Lada Dragwlya likes it that way. Ever since she and her gentle younger brother, Radu, were wrenched from their homeland of Wallachia and abandoned by their father to be raised in the Ottoman courts, Lada has known that being ruthless is the key to survival. She and Radu are doomed to act as pawns in a vicious game, an unseen sword hovering over their every move. For the lineage that makes them special also makes them targets. 

Lada despises the Ottomans and bides her time, planning her vengeance for the day when she can return to Wallachia and claim her birthright. Radu longs only for a place where he feels safe. And when they meet Mehmed, the defiant and lonely son of the sultan, who’s expected to rule a nation, Radu feels that he’s made a true friend—and Lada wonders if she’s finally found someone worthy of her passion. 

But Mehmed is heir to the very empire that Lada has sworn to fight against—and that Radu now considers home. Together, Lada, Radu, and Mehmed form a toxic triangle that strains the bonds of love and loyalty to the breaking point. 

From New York Times bestselling author Kiersten White comes the first book in a dark, sweeping new series in which heads will roll, bodies will be impaled . . . and hearts will be broken.

A link to my review here!

The Wrath & The Dawn by Renée Ahdieh

 In a land ruled by a murderous boy-king, each dawn brings heartache to a new family. Khalid, the eighteen-year-old Caliph of Khorasan, is a monster. Each night he takes a new bride only to have a silk cord wrapped around her throat come morning. When sixteen-year-old Shahrzad’s dearest friend falls victim to Khalid, Shahrzad vows vengeance and volunteers to be his next bride. Shahrzad is determined not only to stay alive, but to end the caliph’s reign of terror once and for all.

Night after night, Shahrzad beguiles Khalid, weaving stories that enchant, ensuring her survival, though she knows each dawn could be her last. But something she never expected begins to happen: Khalid is nothing like what she’d imagined him to be. This monster is a boy with a tormented heart. Incredibly, Shahrzad finds herself falling in love. How is this possible? It’s an unforgivable betrayal. Still, Shahrzad has come to understand all is not as it seems in this palace of marble and stone. She resolves to uncover whatever secrets lurk and, despite her love, be ready to take Khalid’s life as retribution for the many lives he’s stolen. Can their love survive this world of stories and secrets? 

A link to my review here!

The Enemy Within by Scott Burn

Seventeen-year-old Max has always felt like an outsider. When the agonizing apocalyptic visions begin, he decides suicide is his only escape. He soon finds himself in an institution under the guidance of a therapist who sees something exceptional in him. Just as he begins to leave the hallucinations behind, Max discovers the visions weren’t just in his head. 

There are three others who have shared those same thoughts and they’ve been searching for Max. Like him, they are something more than human. Each of them possesses certain abilities, which they’re going to need when a covert military group begins hunting them down. 

As the danger escalates, Max doesn’t know which side to trust. But in the end, his choice will decide the fate of both species. 

Potected by Claire Zorn 

I have three months left to call Katie my older sister. Then the gap will close and I will pass her. I will get older. But Katie will always be fifteen, eleven months and twenty-one days old.

Hannah’s world is in pieces and she doesn’t need the school counsellor to tell her she has deep-seated psychological issues. With a seriously depressed mum, an injured dad and a dead sister, who wouldn’t have problems?

Hannah should feel terrible but for the first time in ages, she feels a glimmer of hope and isn’t afraid anymore. Is it because the elusive Josh is taking an interest in her? Or does it run deeper than that?

In a family torn apart by grief and guilt, one girl’s struggle to come to terms with years of torment shows just how long old wounds can take to heal. 

Zenn Diagram by Wendy Brant 

Eva Walker is a seventeen-year-old math genius. And if that doesn’t do wonders for her popularity, there s another thing that makes it even worse: when she touches another person or anything that belongs to them from clothes to textbooks to cell phones she sees a vision of their emotions. She can read a person’s fears and anxieties, their secrets and loves … and what they have yet to learn about calculus. This is helpful for her work as a math tutor, but it means she can never get close to people. Eva avoids touching anyone and everyone. People think it’s because she s a clean freak with the emphasis on freak but it s all she can do to protect herself from other people’s issues. 

Then one day a new student walks into Eva’s life. His jacket gives off so much emotional trauma that she falls to the floor. Eva is instantly drawn to Zenn, a handsome and soulful artist who also has a troubled home life, and her feelings only grow when she realizes that she can touch Zenn’s skin without having visions. But when she discovers the history that links them, the truth threatens to tear the two apart. 

Zenn Diagram, Wendy Brant’s sparkling debut novel, offers an irresistible combination of math and romance, with just a hint of the paranormal. Readers will swoon over Zenn and connect instantly with Eva, the most fully drawn prodigy in teen fiction today.

A link to my review here!

Love & Vodka: A Book of Poetry for Glass Hearts

Love & Vodka is a poetry book that will touch you deeply. Christina Strigas can bring you into her world and make you feel a part of her story. She takes words and draws you into them until you feel each one with raw intensity. She is a natural-born poet. This poetry book is full of passion, lust and longing with a tour de force that will move the reader with an attention to detail and moments in time. Christina Strigas shows a vulnerabiity in this poetry collection not seen before. Love & Vodka is Christina Strigas’ third poetry book. This book is written for all the hearts that shatter, that are transparent, that crack, rebuild and see truth. This is for the souls that connect through words. The poems in this book will make you breathless from their honesty. This poetry collection is full of poems that will make you contemplate the magic of connections disconnections, rejection, love, drinking, pain, marriage, loneliness, honor and the perils of living so many lifetimes in one. Delve into poetry head first and read passages over again to connect. This book has a modern feel with an ancient way of writing. Inspired by Anne Sexton, Sylvia Plath and modern poets such as Mary Oliver and Billy Collins to name a few, Christina Strigas uses stream of consciousness to devour themes and words and spurt them forth into a poem. A contemporary poetry book that will not disappoint you and that will restore your faith into the power of poetry again.

A link to my review here!

Now I Rise by Kiersten White 

Lada Dracul has no allies. No throne. All she has is what she’s always had: herself. After failing to secure the Wallachian throne, Lada is out to punish anyone who dares to cross her blood-strewn path. Filled with a white-hot rage, she storms the countryside with her men, accompanied by her childhood friend Bogdan, terrorizing the land. But brute force isn’t getting Lada what she wants. And thinking of Mehmed brings little comfort to her thorny heart. There’s no time to wonder whether he still thinks about her, even loves her. She left him before he could leave her.

What Lada needs is her younger brother Radu’s subtlety and skill. But Mehmed has sent him to Constantinople—and it’s no diplomatic mission. Mehmed wants control of the city, and Radu has earned an unwanted place as a double-crossing spy behind enemy lines. Radu longs for his sister’s fierce confidence—but for the first time in his life, he rejects her unexpected plea for help. Torn between loyalties to faith, to the Ottomans, and to Mehmed, he knows he owes Lada nothing. If she dies, he could never forgive himself—but if he fails in Constantinople, will Mehmed ever forgive him?

As nations fall around them, the Dracul siblings must decide: what will they sacrifice to fulfill their destinies? Empires will topple, thrones will be won . . . and souls will be lost. 

A link to my review here!

Sharp Objects by Gillian Flynn 

Fresh from a brief stay at a psych hospital, reporter Camille Preaker faces a troubling assignment: she must return to her tiny hometown to cover the murders of two preteen girls. For years, Camille has hardly spoken to her neurotic, hypochondriac mother or to the half-sister she barely knows, a beautiful thirteen-year-old with an eerie grip on the town. Now, installed in her old bedroom in her family’s Victorian mansion, Camille finds herself identifying with the young victims—a bit too strongly. Dogged by her own demons, she must unravel the psychological puzzle of her own past if she wants to get the story—and survive this homecoming. 

A link to my review here!

Books read out of my tbr this month: 7/10

Currently Reading 

Age of the Ashers by Diana Tyler 

What if all the ancient myths are true?

Eighteen-year-old Chloe Zacharias is perfectly content being an outsider. But an ancient prophecy has different plans, plans to catapult her into the middle of an ages-old war between beings she only thought were mythical. Filled with magic, mystery, and sprinklings of Greek mythology, Age of the Ashers is a powerful fantasy adventure for those who love to lose themselves in the world of make-believe.

Wonder by R.J. Palacio

I won’t describe what I look like. Whatever you’re thinking, it’s probably worse.
August (Auggie) Pullman was born with a facial deformity that prevented him from going to a mainstream school—until now. He’s about to start 5th grade at Beecher Prep, and if you’ve ever been the new kid then you know how hard that can be. The thing is Auggie’s just an ordinary kid, with an extraordinary face. But can he convince his new classmates that he’s just like them, despite appearances?
R. J. Palacio has written a spare, warm, uplifting story that will have readers laughing one minute and wiping away tears the next. With wonderfully realistic family interactions (flawed, but loving), lively school scenes, and short chapters, Wonder is accessible to readers of all levels. 

A Very New Day by Steven Salmon

A Very New Day is about a boy with Cerebral palsy, who goes to go regular school for the first time in junior high and uses Morse code to write. Rich Trout is unable to use his hands. Instead, he drives his electric wheelchair and writes in Morse code with his head. Rich doubts that he belongs in regular school after being isolated to special education classes only.
He is inspired by Mrs. Tilley, his English teacher, who treats him as a regular student and shows Rich that anything is possible. Rich has one dream, to be a writer. Mrs. Tilley introduces Rich to an author friend of hers, who also has Cerebral palsy, serving as an inspiration and role model.

That’s all for this wrap-up! I’m so excited for next month as I will be taking up numerous challenges including a re-try on the book-a-day for the rest of the year, all while also starting up my brand new book club Beyond The Surface! where we will be reading My Heart and Other Black Holes picked by my partner Indy for our very first book of the month! 

Thanks for reading! Let me know what you think of the books I have read this month! Have you read any of them? Which ones would you read? 

-Till next time!

May Reading Wrap-Up 2017


I’ve had a fabulous reading month this month. Which is surprising because the last few months have been pretty slow. So here are the books I’ve read this month! I was going to read 12 books this month, but I read a bit less then that, but I’m still proud because I read more books then earlier months! 

Dying by Cory Taylor 


I loved this book although it made me cry so many tears at the end, it was beautiful and well worth the read! 

A deeply affecting meditation on dying and a wise tribute to life
At the age of sixty, Cory Taylor is dying of melanoma-related brain cancer. Her illness is no longer treatable: she now weighs less than her neighbor’s retriever. As her body weakens, she describes the experience―the vulnerability and strength, the courage and humility, the anger and acceptance―of knowing she will soon die.
Written in the space of a few weeks, in a tremendous creative surge, this powerful and beautiful memoir is a clear-eyed account of what dying teaches: Taylor describes the tangle of her feelings, remembers the lives and deaths of her parents, and examines why she would like to be able to choose the circumstances of her death.
Taylor’s last words offer a vocabulary for readers to speak about the most difficult thing any of us will face. And while Dying: A Memoir is a deeply affecting meditation on death, it is also a funny and wise tribute to life.

Stupid Flowers by Brice Maiurro

This was an amazing poetry collection! I loved it! Also, when your review is quoted on the Goodreads description… 🙂 

“In a playful, often humorous way, Maiurro effortlessly draws on the strange, the surreal, and sometimes the intangible to create the most beautiful and magical imagery.” -Ann Reads Them
“So much of this poetry book is absolutely gorgeous, but not in any way that could be remotely considered typical.” –The Book Raven (hey this is me I wrote this… wahhh!!!)
these poems pull dream from the mundane / these poems are big fish / these poems are bullshit / these poems are that expensive tea with vaguely eastern imagery on the box that says it’s good for anxiety / these poems were written drunk on cough syrup / high on road trip / tripping on murakami / these poems are a call to spiritual warfare / to graceful failure / these poems talk about what we talk about when we talk about robots / these poems are lullabies for insomniacs / for the manic pixie dream boys / these poems are marlboro reds / these poems are newport refries / these poems are poorly timed nirvana / closet skeletons / angels skanking / dances with wolves / your best christopher walken imitation / a fist fight with hemingway / a fist fight with frida / that record that you leave skipping / a city in the middle of nowhere / a bebop manifesto / a train wreck / an awkward first date / these poems / are the stupid flowers / that bloom / in the middle of the night / in the middle of winter 

Magic With Skin On by Morgan Nikola-Wren


This poetry book was too cool for words!!  I haven’t reviewed it, but I will eventually. I’m so happy this book exists! It is truly magical. 

In her much-anticipated debut poetry collection, Morgan Nikola-Wren has woven her signature romantic grit through a stunning, modern-day fairy tale. Chronicling the relationship between a lonely artist and her absent–albeit abusive–muse, Magic with Skin On will gently break you, then put you back together again.

Here We Are: Feminism for the Real World by So Many Authors!


This book is everything! Everyone needs to read it ASAP!!!

LET’S GET THE FEMINIST PARTY STARTED!
Have you ever wanted to be a superheroine? Join a fandom? Create the perfect empowering playlist? Understand exactly what it means to be a feminist in the twenty-first century? You’ve come to the right place.
Forty-four writers, dancers, actors, and artists contribute essays, lists, poems, comics, and illustrations about everything from body positivity to romance to gender identity to intersectionality to the greatest girl friendships in fiction. Together, they share diverse perspectives on and insights into what feminism means and what it looks like. Come on in, turn the pages, and be inspired to find your own path to feminism by the awesome individuals in Here We Are.
Welcome to one of the most life-changing parties around!

Welcome to the Slipstream by Natalka Burian


Quirky yet fun and full of great family relationships, I truly enjoyed this book!

For fans of Laurie Halse Anderson’s Speak and Judy Gregerson’s Bad Girls Club, this is a deeply moving and exquisite novel about a girl traumatized by her mother’s serious mental illness, and the steps she takes to save her from destruction. 
Bright lights, big trouble. 
When Van arrives in Las Vegas at the upscale Silver Saddle casino with her mother—a brilliant businesswoman with fragile mental health—she learns that her mother assigned her a college student, Alex, to “babysit” her. Van is used to having to land on her feet—her mother and surrogate grandmother move from city to city all the time like corporate nomads, but she is not thrilled to have someone watching her now. 
When Alex introduces Van, a talented musician, to an all-girl Sleater-Kinney-style band, she finally has a chance to let her guitar skills shine. But just as she’s about to play her first gig, her mother is lured to Arizona by a con man promising a “vision quest,” and Van must go on the road to find and save her mom from a self-help cult that could ultimately destroy her.

The Wendy Project by Melissa Jane Osborne


I was living for this Graphic novel! A Peter Pan retelling to boot. All I wanted was more!

16-year-old Wendy Davies crashes her car into a lake on a late summer night in New England with her two younger brothers in the backseat. When she wakes in the hospital, she is told that her youngest brother, Michael, is dead. Wendy — a once rational teenager – shocks her family by insisting that Michael is alive and in the custody of a mysterious flying boy. Placed in a new school, Wendy negotiates fantasy and reality as students and adults around her resemble characters from Neverland. Given a sketchbook by her therapist, Wendy starts to draw. But is The Wendy Project merely her safe space, or a portal between worlds? 

The Ship by Antonia Honeywell


This book was amazing! One of my new all time favorites. Read it!

The Ship is a luminous and genre-defying debut novel that follows a young woman’s coming of age in a world where she has no future. 
London burned for three weeks. And then it got worse…
Lalla has grown up sheltered from the chaos amid the ruins of civilization. But things are getting more dangerous outside. People are killing each other for husks of bread, and the police are detaining anyone without an identification card. On her sixteenth birthday, Lalla’s father decides it’s time to use their escape route–a ship he’s built that is only big enough to save five hundred people.
But the utopia her father has created isn’t everything it appears. There’s more food than anyone can eat, but nothing grows; more clothes than anyone can wear, but no way to mend them; and no-one can tell her where they are going. 

That’s all for now! I hope you enjoyed the post. 

Also I have an update for #my500words and today I’m happy to say I hit 542 words!! I decided to start a brand new story and I wrote part of a scene that started as a contemporary that then turned into a sci-fi dystopian that I’m so excited to write! I can’t wait to keep you posted in the future!

-Till next time! 

Febuary Wrap-Up/Book Haul + an announcement 


The month of Febuary was a suprisingly good reading month for me that leads me to be very optimistic for the month of March. I read some pretty amazing novels in Febuary and I know for sure that there are plenty of amazing books in store for the month ahead. I also recieved some pretty cool books in Febuary both from Netgalley and in the mail that I am looking forward to reading in the coming months. 

First my Febuary Book Haul:

NetGalley Books:

Quests of the Kings by Robert Evert 


The List by Patricia Forde 


The Suffering Tree by Elle Cosimano 


Welcome to the Slipstream by Natalka Burian


Hello Me, It’s You by Anonymous, Hannah Todd 


Bad Girl Gone by Temple Mathews


The Ship by Antonia Honeywall


Rose Petal Graves by Olivia Wildenstein


The Resistance: United in Love 


Mail Books:

And I Darken by Kiersten White (Signed copy!!!)


Armor for Orchids by Diana Anderson-Tyler

I read this one in January as an e-arc and the author kindly decided to send me a physical finished copy for my book shelves!

February Wrap-Up

Aftercare Instructions by Bonnie Pipkin

I loved this book so much it was beautifully done. Check out me thoughts here.

Quests of the Kings by Robert Evert 


This book had so much potential, but I didn’t enjoy it as much I wanted to. Read my review here.

The List by Patricia Forde 


This book was everything to me! I thought it was absolutely beautiful and so reminiscent of my childhood. Read more of my thoughts on this book here.

Mask of Shadows by Lindsey Miller 

This book is a great example of what fantasy could be. A review will be posted closer to the release date. 
Hello Me, It’s You by anonymous, Hannah Todd

I knew that I would love this sweet little book of letters. Read my review here.

Use the Force by Joshua P. Warren


I was surprised by how much I enjoyed this book, check out my thoughts here. 
The Announcement

For a long time I have had a bookstagram that I had been sorely neglecting. I am excited to say that I will no longer be neglecting it! I hope to post at least once everyday on my instagram account @the_book_raven

I love taking pictures, especially of books, but for some reason I have always been lazy with my bookstagram and I want to stop that behavior once and for all! It’s time to get myself to be more responsible and do the things I wish to do. 
Thank you all for reading! I hope you enjoyed this post. Have you read any of the books meantioned in this post? If so, what did you think of them? Do you have any book recommendations? I’m always looking for more awesome books! Let me know your thoughts in the comments. 

-Till next time!


December Reading Wrap-Up 2016 

December was a magical time filled with the joys that come with the holidays. It was joyful, wonderful, and mixed with books. 

Some new favorites and happy surprises made up what is my December 2016 wrap-up. 

Dorothy Must Die: Stories by Danielle Paige 


This novella bind-up gave so many insights into the world that is Oz. The set-up to Amy Gum’s story was evident and so interesting. Sassy stories well-told. My full review here.

Go Ask Alice by Beatrice Sparks 


This book could have been so amazing. This book would have been great. I felt so disappointed when things went down the drain. A full discussion here.

Incarceron by Catherine Fisher 


This book takes a long while to process and to fully appreciate every detail it took a while for me to finish this book. There were so many intricacies and wonders packed into this wild ride and I enjoyed every moment I spent reading this. 

A Northern Light by Jennifer Donnelly 


This book! I was so hesitant to read it, but I got one of the biggest surprises of my reading life. This book took my heart and ran away with it. I can’t say enough how much this book means to me! It. Is. So. Incredible. For more coherently expressed thoughts click here.

The Hundred Lies of Lizzie Lovett by Chelsea Sedoti 


The Hundred Lies of Lizzie Lovett was a pleasent suprise on all accounts. I didn’t think I was going to be so impacted by this book that tells a tale of someone who knows what it means to be on the outside. For my full thoughts click here.

Venom by Fiona Paul 


This book was an enjoyable low-stakes end to the year depicting a morbid yet intriguing tale of forbidden love and murder. 

I wish this December didn’t have to come to an end, but I hope to celebrate each and every day as a new beginning for us to grow in. Happy New Year! May your every hope come true. 

-Till next time!

November Reading Wrap-Up 2016

This month was quite the reading month for me. Something that I really did not expect. I ended up reading a total of six books this month and I was extremely happy with all of them! 

1. The Weight of Zero by Karen Fortunati

 

Seventeen-year-old Catherine Pulaski knows Zero is coming for her. Zero, the devastating depression born of Catherine’s bipolar disorder, almost triumphed once; that was her first suicide attempt. 
Being bipolar is forever. It never goes away. The med du jour might work right now, but Zero will be back for her. It’s only a matter of time.
And so, in an old ballet-shoe box, Catherine stockpiles medications, preparing to take her own life before Zero can inflict its living death on her again. Before she goes, though, she starts a short bucket list. 
The bucket list, the support of her family, new friends, and a new course of treatment all begin to lessen Catherine’s sense of isolation. The problem is, her plan is already in place, and has been for so long that she might not be able to see a future beyond it. 
This is a story of loss and grief and hope, and how some of the many shapes of love—maternal, romantic, and platonic—affect a young woman’s struggle with mental illness and the stigma of treatment.

I absolutely adored this book! Here is a link to my review. If this book interests you at all please check it out. This book is one that should not be looked over. 

2. Enclave by Ann Aguirre

York City has been decimated by war and plague, and most of civilization has migrated to underground enclaves, where life expectancy is no more than the early 20’s. When Deuce turns 15, she takes on her role as a Huntress, and is paired with Fade, a teenage Hunter who lived Topside as a young boy. When she and Fade discover that the neighboring enclave has been decimated by the tunnel monsters–or Freaks–who seem to be growing more organized, the elders refuse to listen to warnings. And when Deuce and Fade are exiled from the enclave, the girl born in darkness must survive in daylight–guided by Fade’s long-ago memories–in the ruins of a city whose population has dwindled to a few dangerous gangs.
Ann Aguirre’s thrilling young adult novel is the story of two young people in an apocalyptic world–facing dangers, and feelings, unlike any they’ve ever known.

This book was such a fun read. By the time I got to the end I never wanted to leave the world. I wanted so badly to know what happened next, but alas, it was not yet meant to be. One day I will hold the next book in my hands, one day. 

3, 4, & 5

The Selection, The Elite, and The One by Kiera Cass

book in the captivating, #1 New York Times bestselling Selection series! Discover a breathless fairy-tale romance with swoon-worthy characters, glittering gowns, fierce intrigue, and a dystopian world that will captivate readers who loved Veronica Roth’s Divergent, Ally Condie’s Matched, and Lauren Oliver’s Delirium.
For thirty-five girls, the Selection is the chance of a lifetime. The opportunity to escape a rigid caste system, live in a palace, and compete for the heart of gorgeous Prince Maxon. But for America Singer, being Selected is a nightmare. It means turning her back on her secret love with Aspen, who is a caste below her, and competing for a crown she doesn’t want.
Then America meets Prince Maxon—and realizes that the life she’s always dreamed of may not compare to a future she never imagined.

America’s story was absolutely wonderful! I was so happy to finally read these books. It was light, sometimes sad, and 100% enjoyable. 

6. A Tragic Kind of Wonderful by Eric Lindstrom 

Mel Hannigan, bipolar disorder makes life unpredictable. Her latest struggle is balancing her growing feelings in a new relationship with her instinct to keep everyone at arm’s length. And when a former friend confronts Mel with the truth about the way their relationship ended, deeply buried secrets threaten to come out and upend her shaky equilibrium.
As the walls of Mel’s compartmentalized world crumble, she fears the worst–that her friends will abandon her if they learn the truth about what she’s been hiding. Can Mel bring herself to risk everything to find out?
In A Tragic Kind of Wonderful, Eric Lindstrom, author of the critically acclaimed Not If I See You First, examines the fear that keeps us from exposing our true selves, and the courage it takes to be loved for who we really are.

I absolutely loved this book! It was absolutely authentic and such a comfortable read. Here is the link to my full review here. 

Also check out Blue a poem I wrote inspired by the loveliness that is “A Tragic Kind of Wonderful”

October 2016 Reading Wrap-up

The month of October has been a really busy month for me. Even so, I am proud of the three books that I managed to read this month. 

Eona by Alison Goodman


Eona is the sequel to Eon a book about a girl who is pretending to be a boy in the hopes of being picked by a dragon to become a dragoneye. I highly recommend this duology. The characters, mixed with court intrigue, fantasy, and the urge to cheer for the underdog make these books ones to devour! 

Red Queen By Victoria Aveyard 


I loved this book. I wrote out my thoughts in a review linked here. I was so emotionally attached while reading. There was so many times when I wanted to scream at characters and make them go on a different path to no avail, but in the end I was thrown for a loop by the outcome. I can’t wait to get my hands on Glads Sword!

The Progeny by Tosca Lee 


This book was so, so good! I had no idea what I signed up for when I decided to pick up this book, but I am so happy I did. Tosca is an amazing author that does not disappoint. 

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What books have you read this month? Let me know in the comments below!

-Till next time!